Aviation Archaeology

Simon Parry with Dambuster veteran George Johnson during the filming of ‘The Last of the Dambusters’.
Simon Parry with Dambuster veteran George Johnson during the filming of ‘The Last of the Dambusters’.

Welcome to Wing Leader co-founder Simon Parry’s aviation archaeology site.  Here we hope to tell you about some of the recent excavations that have been carried out in Europe and to provide useful links to web based resources.

Countless aircraft fell to earth during World War 2, many more crashed at other times, but remarkably few of the crash sites were accurately documented. Throughout Europe and indeed the rest of the World, enthusiasts have been gathering information about aircraft crashes in their regions from eye-witnesses before the stories are lost for ever. Usually the wreckage of a crashed aircraft was taken away at the time or salvaged for scrap, but occasionally it has been possible to recover remains that were either lost or deemed to difficult to recover. Depending upon the significance and condition of the parts recovered, items found recently have been displayed in museums or have been used in restoration projects.

 

In the next few weeks we will be uploading stories from the previous years to provide a complete online resource to aviation archaeology in the UK and Western Europe.